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Viewpoint

The never-ceasing phantom of the Music and Drama Center

There is no more appropriate way to describe the architecture at Carleton College other than “eclectic.” Apart from the red-brick theme that dominates the two quadrangles —the Bald Spot and the mini Bald Spot— there is no unifying style of architecture. The Tudor-revival style buildings of the 1920s (Burton, Evans…

Rap has a misogyny problem

The impetus for this piece came in two distinctly different parts. First was my friend William Brewster’s KRLX radio show that showcases “the greasiest of classic rock” (KRLX, Wednesdays, 5:30 to 6:30). The second was an op-ed in the New York Times this week by Jennifer Finney Boylan titled “Should…

Steps toward structural equity: Celebrating Open Access Week

Every October, Carleton’s Gould Library celebrates Open Access Week, creating an opportunity to learn more about the importance of shared knowledge and inspire wider participation in making Open Access a new norm in scholarship and research. But what exactly is Open Access?   Open Access is essentially the principle that research…

Yes, STEM is harder.

This past September, Carleton held its annual Opening Convocation. Between numerous speeches, dedicatories and other processions, Dean Hofmeister recognized students on the Dean’s List, those who achieved academic excellence in the past year. This prompted me to think about my own standing. Where do I, an Art History and Computer…

An international student’s perspective on Family Weekend

It was so nice to see so many happy faces on campus last weekend. Everything seemed a little bit brighter, not only because of the apocalyptic return of summer weather in mid-fall, but because of the lively atmosphere as people reconnected with their families. Even the longer lines were somewhat…

Breaking up Facebook: Through the divide

Within the past several, eventful years, large-scale technological conglomerates, collectively known as the now-menacing “big tech,” have received rampant public criticism following years of nearly unquestioned loyalty and love by both the federal government and a multitude of daily users.  Since the Cambridge Analytica scandal in March 2018, where the…

Is it all what you imagined it to be?

“Is it all what you imagined it to be?” Whether it is a close friend, a former teacher or my own father, I feel like I have been asked this question, or a variation of it, way too many times to count. While one might think that sheer frequency of…

Titane: fast cars, titanium plates and inherited trauma

Julia Ducournau’s “Titane” is finishing its first month of American showing to the delight and horror of audiences. On July 13, 2021, Ducournau became the second woman to win the Palme d’Or award at the Cannes Film Festival and the first woman to win this award solo.  While this prize…

My quest for Icelandic and meaning

Before droves of rain-cloaked tourists attired the landscape in Land’s End reds and blues, before the destination weddings hit the waterfalls and glaciers, before the flood of images of volcanic eruptions graced the likes of Facebook and Instagram, I loved Iceland like she was my own.  Walk through the aisles…

Exhibit Review: “Why Treaties Matter”

Stepping into the “Why Treaties Matter: Self Government in the Dakota and Ojibwe Nations” exhibit, visitors find themselves walking through a carefully constructed master narrative with an ethical dimension. “Why Treaties Matter” is a story of victims and asserts the victimhood of Native Peoples, specifically the Dakota and Ojibwe Nations,…